What Does the Election Mean for Genomics? November 2016 with Nathan and Laura

Guests:

Laura Hercher, Genetic Counselor, Sarah Lawrence College

Nathan Pearson, Genomicist

Chapters:

0:00 Will basic genetic screening tests lose coverage with the threatened dismantling of Obamacare?

7:12 FDA reverses course on LDT regulation

12:18 The parts of genetic medicine that are partisan

19:59 A local election in Florida that went pro-science

While everyone is asking what will become of Obamacare, we ask our regular commentators, Nathan Pearson and Laura Hercher, specifically about genomics and medicine.

Nathan begins by saying that data scientists everywhere should be humbled. Does the failure to predict the election send out warnings about big data predictions in genomics?

Laura points out that Obamacare covers many of the new genetic tests which have become available in the past decade, such as screening tests for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome and lynch syndrome. Coverage for these tests is now up in the air.

"It is cruelly absurd to talk about the value to the human race of identifying the people with these syndromes if we don't then give them the ability to act on the information," she says.

No matter what happens to Obamacare, isn't there bipartisan support for genetic testing and for research funding? (See the passage yesterday of the 21st Century Cures Act.)

Both Nathan and Laura agree that genomic medicine will continue apace. However, they worry that under a Trump administration the less fortunate will become even more vulnerable and have less access to improvements in healthcare. They point to an area of testing that is already highly politicized: prenatal screening. Will women lose access to testing in an era that reverses gains made in women's reproductive rights?

We finish with a local election in the Florida Keyes where residents approved the use of Oxitec's genetically modified mosquitos. Fear, Laura points out, can quickly change suspicion into acceptance.



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