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After Buyout, Cliff Reid, Complete Genomics Stay on Track

Podcast brought to you by: Ingenuity Variant Analysis - Identify causal variants from human sequencing data in just hours.

Guests:

Cliff Reid, PhD, CEO, Complete Genomics Bio and Contact Info

Listen (3:32) Audience questions about Long Fragment Read technology

Listen (3:53) From 200 to 5000 people

Listen (4:11) How do you respond to national security questions?

Listen (4:39) Genomic tests will be commodotized like computers

Listen (7:38) Thoughts on bioinformatics

Listen (2:44) Conversation of bioethics being changed by Facebook generation

Listen (2:51) Future role at the company

In March of 2006, Cliff Reid teamed up with Rade Drmanac and John Curson and founded a company to commercialize a new DNA sequencing platform. But rather than make another sequencing tool and sell it, the company, known as Complete Genomics, would use a different model. They would be devoted entirely to sequencing human genomes as a service. In February of 2009 the company announced its first human genome. By the end of '09, Complete had sequenced 50 human genomes. And in the 3rd quarter of 2010, they sequenced and analyzed 300 human genomes. In 2012, BGI, or Beijing Genomics Institute, offered to purchase Complete for $117 million, and after clearing regulatory hurdles in the US and China, on March 18th the acquisition of Complete was complete.

CEO, Cliff Reid, joins us today in one of his first interviews after the buyout sounding as enthusiastic and on track as he did in our earlier interview. He admits there's a joke in his family that "the fourth time is the charm," because he was involved with two other startups that were ahead of their time. Cliff will be staying on as CEO with the same vision of advancing clinical genome sequencing. He says the company will be commercializing their LFR or Long Fragment Read technology, and he answers questions from our audience about when and how. Acknowledging that the company didn't have the staying power to get to the clinical market and were squeezed out of the research market by an unforeseen preference for exome sequencing, Cliff is still bullish that the price of genome tests must continue to come down further to make a difference in healthcare around the world.