With FDA Guidance on LDTs Still Not Out, What Are Labs Doing?

John Longshore, Director of Molecular Pathology for the Carolinas Pathology Group and Carolinas HeathCare System


0:00 What is your take on the LDT debate?

6;10 Have you shied away from developing more LDTs?

10:33 LDTs or LDPs?

15:33 Do you have the resources or personnel to pursue ‘clinical validity?’

19:38 Labs are being heard on Capitol Hill

As we get closer to the election and the end of 2016, the debate over LDT regulation has gone quiet. At this time last year, there was one hearing after another, first in the Senate, then in the House. The FDA’s Jeffrey Shuren was called before congress and drilled over the nuances of the guidance as well as asked when it would be released. He said, in the first half of 2016.

Though there has been no guidance released, the FDA has continued sending letters out to individual labs, requesting certain LDTs be approved before the labs market them. In March of this year, the FDA put a couple labs and two Texas hospitals on notice that were marketing “high risk” unregulated diagnostics. This surprised many in the laboratory community. These tests were diagnostics to detect the Zika virus, and any delay could negatively impact public health. The FDA told the labs they expected them to submit a request for emergency authorization (EUA).

So what are labs across the country doing? What are they supposed to be doing? Are they shying away from developing new LDTs? Are they proactively working to develop 'clinical validity’ for their tests, something they haven’t had to do under CLIA (the current regulatory statue for labs), but would be required to pursue by the FDA?

Some lab directors, such as today’s guest, say they haven’t changed a thing and are in “wait and see” mode. John Longshore is the Director of Molecular Pathology for the Carolinas Pathology Group and Carolinas HeathCare System, an integrated health network with more than 40 hospitals. He’s optimistic that laboratories are being heard on Capitol Hill and that it won't come down to FDA guidance. Referring to a recent Senate HELP meeting in September 2016 on the topic of LDTs, he says he's confident "that we will have regulation through congressional legislation rather than FDA guidance.”

The debate continues . .

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