A Sneak Peek into the Future of Clinical Genomics with Ben Solomon, Inova

Ben Solomon, Leader of the Medical Genomics Division, Inova

Chapters:

0:00 Who is Inova?

4:28 What are your first projects?

9:56 What are the key questions that have come up?

14:34 Targeted panels or whole genome?

24:48 What part of the process is most costly?

29:48 What are your goals this year?

We hear from some that soon each baby's genome will be sequenced at birth. This vast amount of genomic information will be stored in a person's medical record for life and be referenced for personalized healthcare, be it for a diagnostic, a prognostic, or a prediction. But others say that it is still way too early to be generating so much information on each person when we know so little about the genome. This camp argues that we should deal with patients on a case by case basis using a more targeted approach.

The Inova Translational Medicine Institute offers us a glimpse into questions such as the whole genome vs targeted approach. A unique not-for-profit research institute, they are using genomic information from patients in the Inova Health System’s five hospitals to move them closer to personalized medicine. With this direct access to patients, solid funding, and a location in the Washington/Baltimore government research hub, the institute is no doubt the envy of anyone working to implement genomics into the clinic. Add to that, Inova’s CEO is a former NCI director, John Niederhuber, who has hired some of the best and brightest in genomics.

We talk today with Ben Solomon, who was hired out of the NIH to be leader of the institute’s Medical Genomics Division. He says that one of their first studies looks at the genomes of over 1,000 pre-term birth babies and could be a model for clinical sequencing on a larger scale.

“We enroll folks about halfway through pregnancy," says Ben in today's show. "We generate whole genome sequencing on the baby when the baby is born, but we start collecting samples from mom and dad before the baby is born. Then we do whole genome sequencing on the full trio. And we follow them longitudinally, hopefully throughout their whole life. The oldest patients are four to five years old now. We re-consent them at a certain age.”

The study is an example of staying away from any bias that comes with looking for a particular disease. In fact, Ben says, in the age of genomics, the classical presentation of disease is drastically changing. A longitudinal study like this is about finding the "natural history" of many different conditions.

This particular study uses whole genome sequencing, but much of the work the institute does is targeted sequencing. Ben says that though it's often a blurred line, his team first determines whether the case is research or clinical. If it's a clinical setting, he says the first line approach is to go with a targeted panel, pointing out that the use of panels has grown tremendously over the past few years replacing the "one-off" genetic testing.

"A few years ago when someone was coming in with a question of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, the standard was BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing. And very quickly that has changed into almost always larger panel testing. And even the panels offered are getting much larger."

Ben says there is often resistance to the growing size of panels - including from both genetics professionals as well as other clinicians and patients -because with larger panels, the likelihood of seeing variants of unknown significance increases and with that the challenge of interpretation.

This question of targeted vs whole genome leads to a discussion about how much genome interpretation Ben and his team do in house, demands of a bioinformatics infrastructure, and costs.



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