Vice Chancellor Keith Yamamoto on UCSF’s Role in Medicine Today

Keith Yamamoto, Vice Chancellor for Science Policy and Strategy, Professor of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology at the University of California, San Francisco, UCSF

Bio and Contact Info

Chapters:

0:00 Where are we at today with Obama’s PMI?

9:21 Precision medicine at UCSF: a knowledge network

16:35 ATOM: moving the starting line for drug development

21:42 NIH budget a huge public trust

23: 35 What is the role of UCSF in medicine today?

A major chapter in the history of medicine has been written by UC San Francisco. They are writing the next for precision medicine.

Keith Yamamoto is in both chapters. Since the 1970s, he has been a researcher of cellular and molecular biology at UCSF and now serves as Vice Chancellor of Science Policy and Strategy as well. His career has always had these two parallel tracks of scientist and policy administrator. He has sat on various review boards at the NIH and chaired the Board of Life Sciences at the National Academy of Sciences where he worked with a group that would stimulate President Obama to launch his Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) back in 2015. Today he shares with us what that was like for him.

Though the political wind blows a different direction at the national level these days, the momentum continues for the PMI at NIH, funded, as Keith points out, by congress with the Faster Cures bill for ten years.

And at UCSF? They are just getting started in precision medicine. With an illustrious history in medicine, an enviable location at the tech hub of the world, and resourced to the gills—the university can boast its sixth year in a row of being the top recipient of NIH funds, and rides around the top of the list for private contributions--UCSF is also one of the hosting universities for California’s own Precision Medicine Initiative, which just a few days ago received a huge boost from Governor Brown's new budget.

What is the university doing with all this gold? Keith says UCSF is building a machine, a precision medicine platform, that brings together data from all the disparate places we’ve talked about here on the program—the omics data, wearables information, electronic health records, etc—into an information commons similar to Google Maps, creating a "knowledge network." It’s a story we’re all familiar with, and if anyone can do it, certainly this is the place.

In addition, Keith describes one of the many collaborations UCSF is involved in called ATOM, or Accelerating Therapeutics for Opportunities in Medicine, a public-private consortium that brings the idea of big data sharing to drug discovery at the pre competitive level.

“What we’re moving is the starting line, rather than the finish line", says Keith.

The NIH has spearheaded similar efforts before. Perhaps with UCSF’s star computer science power this effort will go new places.

For those in our audience attending next week’s Precision Medicine World Conference in Silicon Valley, you can hear Keith talk on Accelerating Cancer Therapies and Exploiting Longitudinal Patient Data: Partnering to Achieve Precision Medicine.



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