The Snyderome


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Guest:

Mike Snyder, PhD, Director, Stanford Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine Bio and Contact Info

Chapters: (Advance the marker)

0:42 An update on iPOP

9:02 A model for the clinic?

15:39 How has the project impacted your personal life?

20:46 What is your definition for 'health?'

27:55 Power to the patient

30:11 BONUS: Thoughts on the George Church media flap about cloning Neanderthals

When Mike Snyder gets a cold, the world knows. Hundreds if not thousands of data points change in his body. Snyder, Professor of Genetics at Stanford Medical School, is perhaps the most biologically tracked person on the planet. In our last interview, Mike shared the results of a study that he's calling iPOP, or integrated personal omics profiling. The study achieved recognition around the world for predicting that he had Type 2 Diabetes. At the time he was showing no symptoms. This would not have been caught by any doctor. It was found by tracking his 'omes.' When he went into the clinic to check, his blood glucose level was indeed in disease range, and he immediately went on a strict diet and exercise regime.

In this interview, we follow up with Snyder a year later. He is still tracking his biology, collecting 40,000 data points 20 times in the last 14 months. And he has kept to his strict diet and increased exercise plan. Mike talks about what the study could mean looking forward to using this kind of data in the clinic and also how the study has impacted his personal life. For Mike, health has become a set of data points watched over time. The study has now increased to looking at his microbiome, and ten new subjects are being enrolled for similar tracking. Will the 'Synderome' become the model for omics in the clinic?



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