Training the Next Generation of Bioinformaticians: Russ Altman, Stanford


Guest:

Russ Altman, Dept Chair, Bioengineering, Stanford University

Bio and Contact Info

Listen (5:32) A bioinformatician bottleneck?

Listen (4:19) Does the engineer or coder have enough basic biology?

Listen (5:04) Have we been overly reductionist?

Listen (5:16) Beautiful but useless algorithms

Listen (4:13) New breakthroughs in natural language processing

Listen (3:39) A new regulatory science

For our last episode in the series, The Bioinformatician Bottleneck, we turned to someone who has not only done lots of bioinformatics projects (he's been lead investigator for the PharmGKB Knowledgebase) but also one who is training the next generation of bioinformaticians. Russ Altman is Director of the Biomedical Informatics program at Stanford. He's also an entertaining speaker who's comfortable with an enormous range of topics.

It's been some time since we had Russ to the program, so we had some catching up to do. What are his thoughts on the recent philosophy of science topics we've been discussing? Are the new biologists becoming mere technicians? What is meant by open data? Etc. He warns of being too black and white when it comes to reductionism or antireductionism. And agrees that the new biologist needs quite a bit of informatics training. But he's not worried that all bioinformaticians have to be better biologists, saying that there's a whole range of jobs out there.

What's Russ excited about in 2014? The increased ability to do natural language processing, he says.

"We have 25 million published abstracts that are freely available. So that's a lot of text. Increasingly we're having access to the full text and figures. I think we're near the point where we'll have an amazing capability to do very high fidelity interpretation of what's being said in these articles," he says in today's interview.

Russ finishes up by talking about a new West Coast FDA center in which he's involved. The center is focused on a program for a new emerging regulatory science, which he defines as the science needed to make good regulatory decisions.

"This area of regulatory science," he says, "has great opportunity to accelerate drug development and drug discovery."

I saw Russ at Stanford's Big Data conference after our interview and asked him at what age he decided against Hollywood and for going into a life of academia and science.

"Who says I did?" he retorted without hesitation.

Podcast brought to you by: Roswell Park Cancer Insititute, dedicated to understanding, preventing and curing cancer for over 115 years.



New to Mendelspod?

We advance life science research, connecting people and ideas.
Register here to receive our newsletter.

or skip signup