The Days of Miracle and Wonder: Laura Hercher on Genetic Counseling, Part 1


Laura Hercher, Genetic Counselor, Sarah Lawrence College

Chapters:

0:00 What makes a good genetic counselor?

5:47 The sustained Angelina Jolie effect

11:55 Why are most genetic counselors women?

17:15 Industry vs. clinical

They’ve been called the “unsung heroes” of our age. They are primarily women. And when the trend for most of us is to become specialists, they have been generalists.

Today we begin a special series on genetic counselors. Our first guest, a genetic counselor herself, is a name familiar to our audience. Laura Hercher is one of our regular month-in-reviewers, and today it’s all about her. She is on the faculty at Sarah Lawrence College where the first genetic counseling program was begun in 1969 and where half of the nation’s genetic counselors have been trained.

Like many other fields, there are different schools of thought when it comes to genetic counseling. In today's show, Laura says that the older method was for the counselor to decide what genetic data was good for the patient. It was thought that "genetic information is super explosive, and you have to treat it like non-exploded ordnance all the time and be very very careful what you give out."

Now, Laura says, the trend in genetic counseling matches that in the world at large "where people expect a free flow of information," and more is left up to the patient. "The early studies we've gotten have suggested that people can handle information."

What makes a good counselor? And is there a difference between counseling in the clinical setting and counseling for industry?

These are a few of the questions we cover in Part 1 of the interview.

Listen to Part 2.



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