Deep Omics Profiler, Mike Snyder, Now Turns to Wearables


Mike Snyder, Director, Center for Genomics & Personalized Medicine, Stanford

Bio and Contact Info

Chapters:

0:00 Over 1,000 health related devices on the market

5:32 "Everybody will have ‘em"

9:21 Blood oxygen drops when flying

12:20 Predicting infections

16:02 What about all the dead ends?

24:08 Validation of the iPOP model?

28:40 "How do I learn more about this?" The new book

Mike Snyder is well known in the genomics community for his iPOP (integrated personal omics profiling) study. Profiling himself with hundreds of thousands of measurements each day over a period of seven years and a group of a hundred others for about three years, he and his team at Stanford have shown that sequencing and other omics data can be used to predict Type II diabetes, cancer, heart problems and other disease. He’s also published numerous papers comparing NGS instruments. Now he is expanding iPOP with a whole new set of tools: over the counter wearable devices.

Though Fitbit’s sales may be down, Mike says wearables are hot. His team has found that there are over 1,000 health related wearable devices on the market today. He predicts that we will all be wearing them, using data that will be centralized onto the "dashboard" of our smart phones to drive our health decisions.

Those who have used wearables have used them mostly as “activity monitors,” and they tire of the devices after about three months. His lab, says Mike, is looking at wearables differently by using them as “health monitors.”

“The power of these devices is that they will measure continuously your basic physiological parameters, and we think that complements the other sorts of data that we’ve been collecting quite nicely. We actually think these devices can be used to tell when you’re getting sick.”

Just as when omics data predicted his own onset of Type II diabetes, Mike says wearables data helped him quickly diagnose his contraction of Lyme disease. The data in the recent two year study also showed when three others were getting sick—their heart rates went way up over baseline.

What about all the wild goose chases and the chance for hypchondria?

“I’m a believer in letting the data tell us what’s going on,” he says. "I didn’t know my blood oxygen level dropped on flights. In hindsight, it makes a lot of sense. And that’s what everyone says, 'it makes a lot of sense.' But most people didn’t know that. This could be a big issue for those with pulmonary illnesses.”

We end with a brief discussion of Mike’s new book: “Genomics and Personalized Medicine: What Everyone Needs to Know."

  



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