Ethical Issues around Editing Human Germline for the Future. Today It's about Plants and Animals, Says NYU's Art Caplan


Arthur Caplan, Professor of Medical Ethics, NYU, Author

Chapters:

Listen (5:10) With focus on human germline what about plant and animals?

Listen (6:16) How does the process of bioethics work?

Listen (1:44) How do you split your time between public and academic roles?

Listen (4:46) An exponential rate of change?

Listen (5:37) Can we slow science and technology down?

Listen (4:30) The future of genetic counseling

 Art Caplan is a prodigious writer on the topic of medical ethics. How prodigious? How about thirty-two books and over 700 peer reviewed papers on ethical conundrums ranging from organ donation to end of life care.

He spends about half his time as a public figure, engaging the lay audience, for example, through op-eds like his recent piece for the Washington Post arguing that doctors who oppose vaccination should lose their license. The other half of his time he spends developing materials meant for an academic audience.

In today’s interview, Art begins by saying that ethical issues around the genome editing of plants and animals are much more pressing today than the current furor over human germline editing. That we can leave to our grandchildren, he says. What we must pay more attention to now is the introduction of genetically engineered mosquitos into the ecosystem.

Well versed in all of the major ethical issues which have surfaced here at Mendelspod, including the rise of prenatal diagnostics and abortions and the evolution of privacy, Art is pro science and technology, yet still sees himself like a “biblical prophet."

Just what is the role of a bioethicist? Is it possible to slow down science and technology?

 



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