How Is the Brexit Impacting Genomics? with Clare Turnbull and Hadyn Parry


Guests:

Clare Turnbull, Clinical Lead for 100KGP Cancer Program, Genomics England

Disclaimer: The views Clare expresses in this podcast are her own and not those of Genomics England.

Hadyn Parry, CEO, Oxitec

Chapters:

0:00 Trend toward strong life science support in government up in the air

4:50 Huge amounts of uncertainty, particularly in academia

11:45 Any peers who voted “leave?"

Today's guests have been separately on the program recently. And we've asked them, both Brits, to come back on for a discussion of the Brexit. Clare Turnbull is Clinical Lead for the 100K Genomes Project Cancer Program at Genomics England. Hadyn Parry is the CEO at Oxitec, a company based in Oxford which is already selling their genetically engineered mosquitos into Brazil to deal with viral diseases like Zika and Dengue Fever.

The first question we throw at them is whether they are still in shock over the outcome of the vote. Clare resides in London, and Hadyn in Oxford—both places that voted overwhelmingly to remain in the European Union. In fact, Hadyn says he doesn’t know a single person who voted “leave.”

Clare says Genomics England is funded through 2020, so in the short term, the 100K Genomes Project is secure. She also has a role in academia where most genomics research takes place. There, she says, they are being hit with an immediate impact. 10-15% of grant funding in the British system comes from the EU.

“People are on grants which are running. People have won grants that not yet been awarded. And people are looking to collaborate on grants in the medium term future. And one becomes a pretty unattractive collaborator on an international, pan-European grant when it’s uncertain whether or not we’ll be in the EU. The uncertainty is pretty immediate,” says Clare.

Hadyn says the uncertainty is certainly affecting business in the short term. But points out that in the longer term, the UK is solid. They have a great tradition of science, and they have four of the top ten universities in the world. And their entrepreneurial culture is strong. It’s much easier to do a startup biotech company in the UK than in the rest of Europe.

“The longer term, I’m quite comfortable with,” he says. "It’s all about the uncertainty in the short term. The sooner we move to understanding the rules of the game, the sooner the short term uncertainty can be removed.

For now, both see a country still in shock and denial.



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