We've Become Too Single Variant Centric, Says Deanna Church on Genome Analysis


Deanna Church, Senior Director of Applications at 10X Genomics

Bio and Contact Info

Chapters:

0:00 Thoughts on new 1000 Genomes Project paper

6:25 How did 10X get you?

10:57 What’s new with linked reads?

14:08 Single cell genomics feels today like early days of Human Genome Project

16:36 What roles for public/private institutions in genomics?

From 1999 to 2013, Deanna Church was a staff scientist at the NCBI where, for a time, she headed the Genome Reference Consortium. This was the effort to continually update, improve and maintain the reference genome. Then Deanna went into private industry, first to Personalis--a genome interpretation company, and now she’s Director of Applications at 10X Genomics--the tools company offering linked read sequencing technology. Deanna's work in the public and private genomics domains has given her a comprehensive and even profound knowledge of the human genome and an authoritative ease in communicating about it.

When we asked about the recent paper out by the 1000 Genomes Project—which includes her name as author—that brings to light hundreds of heretofore unknown structural variants, she says this:

“What I think would be really great is to see the community move toward the integration of structural variant calling and short variant calling. These still tend to be very separate. This paper, of course, only dealt with structural variant calling because it's a very challenging problem. Many times the [different] variant calls end up in separate files. What you’d really like to do is have a wholistic view. Analyzing the whole genome and thinking about how all the variants go together will be an important step for the community.”

Many of the scientists we talk to often begin at a tools company and then move on to an institution where they can work with an array of tools. Deanna has gone the other direction. But she says that working at 10X has “expanded her inner scientist.” There she has access to a lab which wasn't the case at the NCBI and is challenged by an array of hard scientific problems brought by customers of their linked read technology.

So what is new in the world of linked reads? What are Deanna’s thoughts on the incredible uptick in single cell sequencing applications? And in an age when the NIH’s budget has been threatened, how does she see the roles of private and public genomics institutions playing out?

It’s Deanna Church for the first time on Mendelspod.



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