bioethics


Big Data Takes the Stage at Stanford

We're currently developing a series on big data here at Mendelspod.  So we jumped at the chance to attend the first 'Big Data in BioMedicine Conference' put on at Stanford in conjunction with the University of Oxford.  The conference gave a great overview of the topic, reaching not only into all that omics data, but health IT and public health as well.  

Documenting the History of Biotech and its Relevance: Mark Jones, Life Sciences Foundation

Podcast brought to you by: Chempetitive Group - Who for more than a decade has helped science-based companies build and execute innovative marketing campaigns. "We love science. We love marketing. We love the idea of combining the two to make great things happen for your marketing communications."

Guests:

Mark Jones, Director of Research, Life Sciences Foundation Bio and Contact Info

Listen (7:14) Why is recording biotech history important?

Listen (11:48) Biotech history, such as that of recombinant DNA, can shed light on current ethical debates

Listen (6:04) A history of tech transfers

Listen (4:12) Can history provide insight to current gene patent case?

Biotech has been around for a while now. Some of the original pioneers of the field are getting along in years or have passed. To record and preserve the history of biotech, the Life Sciences Foundation has been established. Their website is becoming a rich, one stop source, to trace back the big achievements of the last 40-50 years with lots of videos and articles on the pioneers and major players in our field. In addition to the website, the foundation puts out a regular magazine and sponsors events such as the talk and reception at UCSF recently entitled the Centaur and the Whale and the emergence of biotech, an event devoted to remembering two early biotech companies, Chiron and Cetus.

Mark Jones is the director of research at the Life Sciences Foundation and has recently been going around the country taking down oral histories. In today's show he talks about what the history of the industry can tell us about issues of today.

Biotech, Policy, and the 2012 Election with Lee Silver

Podcast brought to you by: See your company name here. - Promote your organization and align it with today's latest trends.

Guest:

Lee M. Silver, PhD, Princeton University Bio and Contact Info

Listen (5:56) What is at stake for biotech in the 2012 election?

Listen (2:05) What do you say to those who insist science should not be on the dole?

Listen (7:39) What is your take on the recent report by Obama's Bioethics Panel?

Listen (6:14) California's Prop 37 a "stupid" thing

Listen (5:56) Controversy over bird flu virus not an easy one

Listen (11:54) GenePeeks offers better filtering at sperm banks

Listen (1:13) Is the consumer genetics movement over?

Lee Silver is an expert on biotech and public policy at Princeton University. He is the author of several books including, Remaking Eden: How Genetic Engineering and Cloning Will Remake the American Family. No time is better to get the thoughts of the renowned author than election season.

Silver has been outspoken about biotech policy differences between the Bush and the Obama administrations, and we ask him to extend his thoughts on the upcoming election. He also weighs in on California's Prop 37 requiring the labeling of genetically modified foods. Lee says it's a "stupid" thing. That even if the law is passed, it is not even doable.

Other topics include the controversy over the modification of the bird flu virus and whether the science should have been published, and GenePeeks, Silver's new company that is creating virtual children.



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