cancer genomics


The Solid Future of Liquid Biopsies with Michael Nall, Biocept

There’s been lots in the news this past year about liquid biopsies—those non-invasive tests which locate biomarkers in a vial of blood. Much of that press (perhaps too much) has been about using these blood tests for cancer screening: predictive tests that could be available to consumers some time in the future.

But according to today’s guest, the real news about liquid biopsies is that they are in use now. Michael Nall is the CEO of Biocept, a company based in San Diego which has gone about as far as any organization in commercializing these non-invasive tests. They offer tests for many kinds of cancer, including breast, colon, prostate, and lung.

“The area we’re focused on really hasn’t gotten as much attention [as the cancer screening tests]. And yet it’s the nearest term and the biggest unmet medical need today: how do you help patients who have been diagnosed with cancer and who are progressing?” says Michael in today’s interview.

Biocept stands out in the space for not only their comprehensive line of testing, but for their demonstration of just how to commercialize these tests. The company has thirteen salespeople around the country who call directly on clinics. They are focused on two niches: cases where the cancer has metastasized in the bones or the brain and cases where not enough or no solid biopsy can be obtained.

Most importantly, Biocept has succeeded in getting paid for their tests using the same existing CPT codes that are used for the solid tumor tests.

Will we soon see a time when the liquid biopsy is the preferred test? How is Biocept preparing for impending FDA regulation? Hear this early success story for a pioneer in a rapidly growing field.

Digital Pathology at Scale: Epic Sciences Takes CTC Technology to the Next Level

It’s the beginning of the age of liquid biopsies, when less invasive, regular blood draws will provide more information than the occasional solid tissue biopsy. Companies that offer tests based on circulating tumor cells or cell free DNA in the blood are popping up like genome interpretation companies were a few years ago. As our understanding of biology at the molecular level advances--particularly in the field of cancer research--the more this practical and focused approach for teasing out the information in the cell, in the body gains steady adoption.

The success of prenatal diagnostics with a small amount of blood from the mother has shown us—and investors—that there’s there’s a wealth of information and money to be made from blood samples. And the promise of a non-invasive procedure to provide more important data than traditional biopsies can seems too good to be true.

Yet, we’re still in the early days. Few liquid biopsy tests have been commercialized. Today’s guest, Murali Prahalad, is the CEO of Epic Sciences. They are touting a new platform for analyzing circulating tumor cells, or CTCs. This has been a tricky space for companies (remember On-Q-ity?), so the big question for Murali is what makes Epic better?

Murals says that previous CTC technologies made some "grounding assumptions," such as that the cells had to have surface proteins used to isolate them, or that they had to be larger in size than the surrounding white blood cells.

“What we’ve said is let’s admit we don’t know what we don’t know. So let’s shotgun this. Let’s look at all the nucleated cells and get them on a proprietary glass slide and then use a mixture of staining, imaging, and computation techniques to really figure out what’s cancer from normal. So we’re not making any grounding assumptions here. And what it’s done is reveal a far greater range of these species in the blood than we ever thought possible. . . . We let the biology reveal what we should be worrying about.”

That all sounds fair and good. Now how will Epic take their latest studies and commercialize them into clinical assays that doctors can use?

For inspiration, Murali draws on the history of HIV drug development. It is now customary for AIDS patients to keep regular counts on their viral load as they manage their illness with one pill a day. This type of regular screening using just blood samples could become the norm in cancer as well. Quoting Mark Twain, Murali says, “history may not repeat itself, but it does rhyme."

January 2016: Landergate, Grail, and Cancer Moonshot

“It being the month of Hypeuary, go hither through break in yonder wall called LanderGate, and thou wilt be on route to reach the Grail. Drink from this to find your Cure, and Death shall haunt you even more.” -Pithy Monton

Today we do something a little different. We’re joined by two commentators to look back over the past month’s headlines. Laura Hercher is a genetic counselor on the faculty at Sarah Lawrence College. She’s also a regular contributor to the DNAExchange blog. Nathan Pearson is the Senior Director of Scientific Engagement and Public Outreach at the New York Genome Center.

Roche Sequencing Preparing a Full Workflow Liquid Biopsy Platform

Today's interview is with John Palma, Senior Director of Medical Affairs with Roche SequencingSolutions. John says that Roche is going for a best-in-class, full workflow liquid biopsy solution, from sample prep to final data reporting.

So what will be the competitive advantage to Roche's liquid biopsy platform? Which analytes are they focused on: circulating tumor cells, cell free DNA, exosomes? And will they go RUO or IVD?

The incredible growth of prenatal diagnostics has rapidly advanced liquid biopsy technology, says John. And Roche is already a major player in the prenatal space with their Harmony test.



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