DNA synthesis


The Meteoric Rise of Twist Bioscience and the Wild Demand for DNA: Emily Leproust, CEO

In 2013 Twist Bioscience was a newcomer to a market that most of us thought was saturated, cornered, commoditized—that of synthetic DNA. But Emily Leproust and her co-founders saw something different. They saw "a big market with unhappy customers.” Today, with a radically disruptive technology, they are market dominant. Twist is a publicly traded company whose stock has doubled already once since they IPOd last year. Imagine, a DNA synthesis company going public! And then seeing their stock perform so well. This is tricky for the most hyped of tech or biotech startups.

And the demand for DNA is only going up, and dramatically up. When Twist signed a deal with Gingko Bioworks in 2017 for 1 billion bases, that single order was bigger than the entire market two years previous.

Today, for the first time the Twist CEO joins us on the program to talk about where her company came from (another planet?!) and about why there is such demand for DNA. What applications should we know most about? Is all this demand the result of hyped up investment, or are the products going to market?

“Synthetic biology is currently changing our lives and people don’t even realize it. People won’t say, 'oh that’s cool synthetic biology.' They won’t. They’ll just know they have a leather jacket. And there’s no cows harmed in the making of that leather jacket because that leather jacket was created from kampuchea and synthetic biology. And I think that’s the future of the impact of our industry.”

Window on the Life Science Industry: A Conversation with Trey Martin, IDT

Guest:

Martin Trey, COO, Integrated DNA Technologies

Bio and Contact Info

Listen (4:32) The oligo factory

Listen (3:30) How have you stayed relevant in the age of sequencing?

Listen (3:39) A breakthrough in oligo length

Listen (7:18) A window on the industry

Listen (4:12) Thoughts on synbio

DNA. It’s at the core of biology and the life science industry. Integrated DNA Technologies, or IDT has been making DNA for the industry for twenty five years.

Mendelspod has been working for some time now to persuade someone from IDT to come on the program and tell us about their history--how they began, why they're in Coralville, Iowa, and what important trends they're observing.

Beginning a new series entitled Beyond the Oligo, we’re joined by IDT’s Chief Operating Officer, Trey Martin, for a wide ranging discussion about the company beginnings and their unique perspective on a rapidly changing industry.

Further episodes of this series will feature some of IDT's customers-from clinical genomics to synthetic biology-who are using DNA to pioneer dramatic new advances in human health and the way we are moving forward as a species.

Podcast brought to you by: Chempetitive Group - "We love science. We love marketing. We love the idea of combining the two to make great things happen for your marketing communications."

Disrupting Synthetic Biology: Kevin Munnelly, Gen9

Podcast brought to you by: Chempetitive Group - Who for more than a decade has helped science-based companies build and execute innovative marketing campaigns. "We love science. We love marketing. We love the idea of combining the two to make great things happen for your marketing communications."

Guest:

Kevin Munnelly, CEO, Gen9 Bio and contact Info

Chapters: (Advance the marker)

0:39 A disruptive change to synthetic biology

6:56 Why hasn't gene synthesis progressed along with sequencing?

10:14 Looking at the market: applications for synthetic biology

15:29 Educating the market the biggest challenge

19:01 PR efforts going into biosecurity

25:07 Personal path to Gen9

As part of our series on synthetic biology, we talk with Kevin Munnelly, CEO of Gen9, a new gene synthesis company founded by George Church of Harvard, Joseph Jacobson of MIT, and Drew Endy of Stanford. According to Munnelly, Gen9 is not just another gene synthesis company, but one which will dramatically disrupt the space. The theory is that just as the declining cost of sequencing has enabled new applications for genomics, so too will a drastically reduced price for synthetic genes. Kevin believes we are just at the beginning of a synthetic biology revolution and it's new technology such as his that will enable it. What are these new applications and why hasn't gene synthesis kept pace with sequencing we ask Kevin in today's show.



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