gene editing


Commercializing the Genetically Altered Mosquito: An Interview with Hadyn Parry, Oxitec

Guest:

Hadyn Parry, CEO, Oxitec

Bio and Contact Info

Listen (7:11) What is your commercialization plan?

Listen (5:32) The awesome trial at Mandacaru

Listen (1:55) What concerns do you hear from regulators?

Listen (4:18) Different from agricultural GM products

Listen (6:19) Objectives and obstacles for 2014

Listen (5:44) PR - that extra burden for synbio

In the fall of 2012, Hadyn Parry began his London TED talk with one of those simple facts which gets everyone listening: The world’s most dangerous animal is a small insect commonly called, the mosquito. It has killed more people than any other creature, and in fact more people than wars have killed. But the threat from mosquitos is not just a thing of the past. Dengue fever is a growing global health problem. Spread by the Aedes Aegypti mosquito, it infects between 50 and 100 million people annually. Reported cases have increased 30 fold in the past 50 years.

Parry is the CEO of Oxitec, a synthetic biology company which is using genetic engineering to control populations of the dengue mosquito and other harmful insects. It's a simple solution. A genetically altered neutered male is introduced to the wild population of mosquitos. Offspring are also born neutered. In a field trial with the Brazillian town, Mandacaru, the Oxitec product was able to reduce the mosquito population by a whopping 96%. This is a brilliant solution that works. But often with synthetic biology companies, the great technology is just the beginning. Oxitec faces an uphill climb with commercialization. No one has ever presented regulators with such a product. And then there is the PR issue.

In today's interview, Hadyn shares the Oxitec commercialization plan and the PR strategy for his promising new company.

Podcast brought to you by: See your company name here. - Promote your organization by aligning it with today's latest trends.



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