genomic medicine


It's Settled: We have a Candidate for First Mayor of Mars

Let me share a bit of my past. There’s some fine irony here to enjoy.

I grew up fundamentalist Mormon. Mormons believe that we are practicing to be gods ourselves. Fundamentalist Mormons believe that Adam is God. That God himself came to earth to start the whole human race. And so too, (“and so too” is a nice Mormon phrase) we may become Gods ourselves. And then go build our own planets. And people them too. (That's right, the presidency is really just a stepping stone for Mitt Romney. He'll have more wives and many more kids when he gets his own planet someday.)

$1,000 Genome No Good

There comes a time when powerful memes that have become widespread begin to lose their value. Is it that time for ‘The $1,000 Genome?’ Mark Boguski thinks so. At the first annual Clinical Genome Conference in San Francisco this week, Dr. Boguski from Harvard Medical School said that the term is actually fallacious. The price of sequencing has come down.

Sequencing and Genomic Medicine with Cliff Reid, Complete Genomics

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Guest:

Cliff Reid, CEO, Complete Genomics Bio and Contact Info

Listen (2:20) Sequencing humans on both ends of life

Listen (4:08) Looking back at 2011

Listen (1:48) Business model validated

Listen (2:12) Partnership with DNAnexus

Listen (4:56) Standards too early a terrible thing for an industry

Listen (4:20) What happened with the stock?

Listen (6:26) Sequencing for the clinic

Listen (5:38) Path to $1000 genome

Listen (1:17) Plan in place to sequence millions of genomes

Listen (3:51) Personal path to DNA sequencing

Listen (7:05) Biggest challenge

Listen (2:08) Not a taker, but a maker of a revolution

Listen (1:00) Inspired by Churchill

Cliff Reid is the co-founder and CEO of Complete Genomics. The company sets itself apart by first, providing sequencing and data analysis as a service and second, by focusing exclusively on human DNA. Complete Genomics has announced several large scale partnerships this year, including one with Scripps Health for a “wellderly” study, looking at the DNA of healthy individuals with median age of 87 and with Inova Health systems to sequence the genomes of 500 babies and their parents. Cliff shares how he came to DNA sequencing and his thoughts on disruptive technologies. (Recorded Dec, 2011)

The Business of Translating the Genome: Burrill’s Personalized Medicine Conference 2011

If we’re still in the Wild West of genomics, Steve Burrill could be called one of the major ranchers. In a landscape new and still quite unknown, Burrill has tamed a large plot and established Burrill and Co. as a place newcomers to the area as well as the local population can come for advice, knowledge of the surroundings, and perhaps a deal. Burrill is comfortable in his frontier lifestyle.

Misha Angrist: "Here is a Human Being"

Guest:

Misha Angrist, Ph D, MFA, Author, "Here is a Human Being: At the Dawn of Personal Genomics"Bio and Contact Info

Listen (3:44) Misha 1: PGP a "microcosm" of our lives

Listen (7:03) Misha 2: Why take part in the PGP?

Listen (2:46) Misha 3: The Role of DTC Companies

Listen (1:15) Misha 4: Why not tell daughters about their risk?

Listen (2:13) Misha 5: "Consenting to uncertainty"

Listen (6:53) Misha 6: Experience with Francis Collins

Listen (0;57) Misha 7: X Prize

Listen (1:14) Misha 8: Impression of Jim Watson

Listen (5:05) Misha 9: George Church "the hero of the book"

Listen (2:19) Misha 10: Finally seeing his genome

Listen (3:32) Misha 11: How far along is the PGP?

Listen (4:11) Misha 12: 80 billion bases is a "metric shitload of data"

Listen (2:26) Misha 13 Detractors to the PGP

Listen (1:35) Misha 14: Genomic Resources

Listen (3:05) Misha 15: Sage Bionetworks

Listen (3:30) Misha 16: Is the PGP for everyone

Known as "PGP4," Misha was the fourth member of the original 10 to volunteer to the Personal Genome Project begun by Dr. George Church at Harvard. He has had his genome sequenced and made publicly available. Misha chronicles his experience with the PGP in his recent book, Here is a Human Being: At the dawn of Personal Genomics. Anyone can go to personalgenomes.org and see that Misha is severely allergic to pollen, ragweed and cats. He takes daily Udo’s Choice Adult Blend of Probiotic, Omega 3 Fatty Acids through fish oil, and Lexapro. He is a white, male with A- blood type, is right hand dominant, and wears prescription glasses for near and farsighted vision. One can also find any number of unique genetic variants that Misha carries, including A481T and R305W, variants of the OCA2, an albinism gene. Misha, however, is not albino. The book also tracks the race to the fastest, cheapest mode of next generation sequencing. Dr. Angrist is an assistant Professor at the Duke University Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy. We are happy to have him to mendelspod to talk about his book and about the issues around the intersection of genomes and society.

Genomes on Facebook? Beyond Sequencing 2011

Who owns our genomic data? This question began a panel discussion titled “When People Share Their Genome on Facebook” at the second annual Beyond Sequencing conference in San Francisco Tuesday. The panel was led by Bio-IT World’s editor-in-chief, Kevin Davies, author of The $1,000 Genome. Another panelist, Dr. Pilar Ossorio, quickly deflected the question saying “it’s not a matter of ownership.” She posed another question, could a representation of one’s genomic data be copyrighted? According to Dr.

Personalized Medicine World Conference 2011

This week I attended the 3rd annual World Conference for Personalized Medicine held at Microsoft’s Computer Science Museum in Mountain View, California. A museum for the history of computing seemed appropriate for a new industry which has been dramatically impacted by the accelerating pace of technological innovation. The most oft quoted theme in the conference: that the price of sequencing an entire genome has dropped at breathtaking speed over the last few years. Just four years ago, the price for a genome sequence hovered in the tens of millions of dollars.



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