immunotherapy


Green Light for DTC, Blood Mammograms, and Ancient DNA: April 2017 with Nathan and Laura

For genomics nerds, April 2017 will be remembered as the date when the FDA adopted a more open policy towards 23andMe and direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing. What does this decision mean, and just where is the FDA drawing the line? A genetic counselor herself, Laura found the decision “head turning.”

“There’s lots of reasons why some genetic counselors are not going to be thrilled to deal with everyone’s 23andMe results,” she says.

For the “cool new studies” section of today’s show, Laura is excited about a research project announced by Grail, a spinoff from Illumina working on a pan cancer screening test. And Nathan points out that the trend for researchers to look back at ancient DNA sharpened this month with two new studies that not only open up the possibilities for historians and archeologists but also have relevance to human health longterm.

“We’re getting much better at doing it,” he says. “So look for more of this ancient meta genomics where we can find little fragments of DNA outside of cells but intact in sites like soil. They’re very diverse, but we're starting to figure out really what was going on at a place some time in the past."

We finish with a couple stories that are giving pause to researchers working on gene therapy and immunotherapy.

It’s commentators Nathan Pearson and Laura Hercher joining Theral to talk genomics for April.

Putting the Bench Next to the Bedside: Laurence Cooper, MD Anderson Cancer Center

Guests:

Laurence Cooper, MD, PhD, MD Anderson Cancer Center

Bio and Contact Info

Listen (4:55) When clinical science and bench research is one and the same

Listen (10:40) Single cell genomics enabling next level of immunotherapy

Listen (5:00) Marrying immunotherapy with gene therapy - Four clinical trials

Listen (4:18) Is this a new model for drug development?

Listen (8:30) Why has the war on cancer taken so long?

Laurence Cooper is one of those rare MD and PhD hybrids-what he calls a "'super nerd." Specializing in immunotherapy at MD Anderson Cancer Center, Dr. Cooper is a pediatric oncologist with a very important resource: he also runs a laboratory where he's able to study the basic biology underlining his patients' cancers.

"Clinical science and bench research are one and the same," he affirms in the interview.

This concept is nothing new. But that a doctor is able to treat his patients with therapy developed in his own laboratory is very rare.

Today's show with Dr. Cooper is the final program in our series on single cell genomics. He explains how the new tools for looking at and manipulating individual cells are transforming immunotherapy. Today, treatment for childhood leukemia has become much more targeted and way less toxic.

And Dr. Cooper is not limited only to naturally occurring stem cells in a donor to transplant to his patients. With genetic engineering, his lab is able to create or reengineer specific cell types for transplant. Currently the lab has four clinical trials going which enable Dr. Cooper and his team to treat his own patients with the latest therapies that are developed in the lab.

This marriage between the clinic and the lab is a powerful example of the translation of biomedical science. Could it be a model for drug development?

That depends a lot on funding, concedes Dr. Cooper. His lab is funded by MD Anderson, but also in large part through NIH grants. The interview ends with a discussion on funding for the "war on cancer" with a provocative comparison to the "war on terror."

On 9/11, 3,000 people died. Yet every two days, that many people die from cancer. Dr. Cooper wonders why "the outrage of 9/11 has not yet translated into outrage of still having 3,000 people die every two days."

We hope to have Dr. Cooper back on the program soon as part of our series on the "war on cancer."

Podcast brought to you by: Fluidigm - The leader in single-cell genomics and maker of the C1™ Single-Cell Auto Prep System. The path less traveled just got easier.



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