sequencing


The Era of the Social Genome with Rodrigo Martinez, Veritas Genetics

Two years ago Veritas Genetics began offering whole genome sequencing for a thousand dollars. It was a significant milestone—and still is!—not only for what it means about the company providing the genomes but also what it means about the demand for such a product.

Today we talk to Rodrigo Martinez, the Chief Marketing and Design Officer at Veritas and co-author of a recent blog, Next in The Genomics Revolution: The Era of the Social Genome. The blog puts the current offer of whole genome sequencing into the larger context of the history of genomics, compares the availability of the whole genome to that of the personal computer, and anticipates how interacting with our genomic data may begin to shape our lives.

We have two core questions for Rodrigo: What does a whole genome mean to Veritas? And why should one order a whole genome test?

Rodrigo argues that the time of having single one-off genetic tests or even panels of tests has been superseded. Why not get a whole genome test at the same low price, open an online account with all of our genomic information, and have it all there ready for any future interaction?

Veritas offers their product to physicians and to consumers, giving us another perfect chance to continue our ongoing discussion here on the program about the blurring of DTC borders.

It’s our first interview with someone from Veritas. And it’s a lively and long one.  Rodrigo is a deep diver and never short of breath or ideas.  Enjoy.

Meet Christian, Janos, and the New World of 3D Oncology

Today we engage in a rare discussion between a startup founder who is going beyond sequencing and working directly with cancer patient cells in 3D cultures and with one of his customers, the husband of a cancer patient.

Meet Christian Regenbrecht, the CEO of CPO or Cellular Phenomics and Oncology based in Berlin, Germany and Janos Flosser, a fund manager who invests in technology from Copenhagen, Denmark.

Today’s show is not only special for the fact that we have a researcher/entrepreneur sitting down directly with a patient for the interview, but also for a bold new approach to cancer genomics. Christian is not shy with his attitude about how we must shift our thinking toward oncology.

“Sequencing alone has proved remarkably unhelpful. And the belief that sequencing your DNA is going to extend your life is a cruel illusion,” says Christian at the outset of the interview.

So just what is Christian up to at CPO? How did Janos, a fund manager in another country, find Christian? And is this the new face of cancer treatment?

Illumina Concedes on Long Reads, Buys PacBio

At 1:02 pm today, there was a tremor in the world of genomics as it was announced that the two leaders in the field of sequencing have become one company. Goliath has opted to pick David up and put him on his shoulders. Upon first reaction, I'd say three things. 1. High quality long reads are the future of sequencing. Disrupting a standard carried for years in the drive toward the $1,000 genome of quantity over quality, PacBio stepped in and raised the bar for the technology of DNA sequencing.

Liquid Biopsy for Infectious Disease with Mickey Kertesz, Karius

Sequencing goes to the world of infectious disease.

Building on the work with cell free DNA in prenatal diagnostics and cancer genomics, the team out of Steve Quake’s lab that brought us Moleculo has now launched a new company in infectious disease called Karius. In today’s interview, Karius CEO and co-founder, Mickey Kertesz, recalls the day four years ago when a clinician urgently contacted he and his team with an infected patient that could not be diagnosed by any traditional method. The team took on the case, and though the patient died within a couple days--Mickey recalls the Saturday when the team heard—they went on working on the diagnosis.

“We were very focused and went on fixing the software as if not wanting to believe what we heard.”

After a week the team did arrive at a diagnosis which was confirmed by the autopsy. That patient became patient zero, and the event turned Mickey again into an entrepreneur.

"This was not just cool research, this needs to go quickly into patient and clinician hands,” he thought.

Today Karius is an active company, selling their tests to hospitals around the country, working first on the most difficult cases.

Will these diagnostic tests by sequencing replace the traditional blood tests some day?

“Oh yeah. In a few years, this will be the first line of defense," Mickey says.

Eric Schadt and Sema4 Try the Consumer Model with Newborn Screening Panel

"We like to refer to it as consumer initiated, but physician supervised,” says Eric Schadt today when asked if his new test is direct-to-consumer.

Eric is the Dean for Precision Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York and since 2016 has served as CEO of Sema4, a spinoff that he founded out of the Mount Sinai Health System. Sema4 launched a newborn screening panel, Sema4 Natalis, in February of this year covering over 190 disorders.

With 400 people already employed, Sema4 is based largely on genetic testing, data science, bioinformatics, and software development teams that were built up at Mount Sinai prior to the spinout. New panels will be marketed directly to parents around the country, many of whom have already bought other prenatal screening tests from Sema4.

From 2011 to 2017, Eric served as the Founding Director of the Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology at Mount Sinai. He says he founded Sema4 to achieve a greater scale than could be had within a single hospital system. For him and Sema4, the end game is to "partner with" tens of millions of patients for ongoing studies. He calls it his "growth hack" strategy.

The Natalis panel is a practical place to start. Many of the additional rare childhood disorders that expand the panel beyond the conventional heel prick testing of 30-50 disorders are the result of new research and the latest technology and are a no brainer. This will bring some uniformity across states. And the new testing can be done from a cheek swab rather than the more invasive heel prick.

Still, some argue, Sema4 Natalis really amounts to doing research on parents. For the panel includes cancer risk tests as well.

Does Eric plan to do any follow up studies with parents? Mount Sinai is the sole owner of Sema4. Has any other major healthcare provider made a play similar to this?

State of Sequencing 2018 with Keith Robison, Omics! Omics! Blogger

Sequencing geeks are fresh off the trail from AGBT, and it’s time for our annual look at the sequencing tools space. This year we sit down with the longtime Omics! Omics! blogger, Keith Robison, who not only can answer all your questions about the topic, he even knows which sequencer you’re using right now, and in which department.

Keith jauntily runs through the Big 3--Illumina, Pac-Bio, and Oxford Nanopore--and has a few odds and ends to say about the "niche developers."

We finish by asking Keith what new trends and new instruments he's looking at. He says his son is a senior in high school where Keith has offered to go in and demonstrate the MinIon nanopore sequencer.

"Imagine if the next generation of kids all learns sequencing on this little device. It starts becoming a practical reality where kids in high school--even middle school--learn sequencing and then learn data analysis."

The Flongle Generation, anyone?

Direct RNA-Seq Project Shows Nanopore Sequencing Can Reveal New Insights into Basic Biology: Winston Timp, JHU

Nanopore sequencing has arrived. Passing test after test this past year--including one we discuss today--this technology which was being hyped decades ago is delivering on its promise.

Winston Timp joins us today. He's an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins and one of the leaders on a recent large scale project to directly sequence RNA on an array of nanopores. Winston's is the first in a series of shows we've lined up with users of Oxford Nanopore's technology.

Why RNA-seq? Hasn’t this been done for years?

Yes, says Winston, but in the past no one has been looking at the RNA itself. They’re usually making cDNA from the RNA and sequencing that.

“One of the big advantages to nanopore sequencing, is that you can characterize any polymer you can put in the pore.”

Nanopore sequencing is polymer agnostic.

So what good does it do to look at the RNA directly? Ever heard of epitranscriptomics? Winston has worked for a while on DNA methylation in his lab. Now he’s looking at RNA methylation. Not only is he seeing basic biology that we've never seen before (unique isoforms, exon connectivity that has been imputed by informatics but never seen directly), he’s coming up with new translational questions for health and disease.

When we started Mendelspod seven years ago, the next gen sequencing race was in full swing. It was all about the push to bring down the price of sequencing. The lower cost brought an excitement to the world of biology with all the new projects it made possible. But we found out there were was a major limitation to the technology. Read length. Over the past couple years, PacBio paved a whole new world with their long reads that enabled many new genomic projects. BioNano gave us the big picture with their optical mapping. Today users of nanopore sequencing are generating reads of 1 megabase and the versatility of the nanopore is giving scientists even newer views of biological activity. The race is still very much on.

The State of Genomics 2018 with Nathan, Laura, and Misha

Our first show of the year is an outlook on genomics for 2018. To do this we’re joined by our regular commentators, Nathan Pearson and Laura Hercher, and also by a special guest to mix things up a bit, Misha Angrist, Associate Professor at Duke University and Editor in Chief of Genome Magazine.

Misha wrote a seminal book on the rise of next gen sequencing and personal genomics (Here is Human Being: At the Dawn of Personal Genomics). After working at Knome, Ingenuity, and the New York Genome Center, Nathan recently founded his own company, Root, which works closely with tissue donor registries to give back DNA information to consumers for free. Laura is recognized as a leader in the field of genetic counseling, being a counselor herself and training many of today's working counselors.

Join us as we ask, where are we in genomics today?

A New “Middle Way” for Genomics, with Physical Chemist, Yuval Ebenstein

“I love low tech,” says today’s guest.

It’s not your typical catch phrase for 2017. But then today’s guest is not your typical genome scientist.

A professor in the Department of Chemical Physics at Tel Aviv University in Israel where he runs the NanoBioPhotonix Lab, Yuval Ebenstein came to the genome from an unusual direction. As a physical chemist he started working with DNA as “just a material.”

The low tech is the method of visualizing genomes with microscopy, such as the old FISH or cytogenetic experiments. However, with the advances in imaging and single molecule analysis, he can now go far beyond these dated methodologies and "take dense chromosomes and stretch them out and read information along them in a very sensitive and informative way that is not accessible to other established genomics techniques."

“I love low tech and then giving it a little twist and turning it into high tech," he adds.

Yuval calls the twist a new “middle way” in genomics, between the large structural cytogenomics of the past and all the specific base calling going on now with next gen sequencing. Will his lab’s work turn into a new instrument able to be commercialized?

He says that PacBio, Oxford Nanopore, and BioNano are making headway in filling in this third or middle way, but that yes, there are new techniques that everyone should be able to use.

One specific paper Yuval’s group has recently preprinted is a method for isolating and cloning very long fragments of DNA using Cas9, or what his group calls CATCH (Cas Assisted Targeting of Chromosome Segments).

“This is a nice demonstration of taking low tech and reviving it,” he says.

It’s also an example of what Yuval says is the problem today with NGS, which is too much data.

To look at certain regions of the genome, such as BRCA, one does whole genome sequencing, or exome sequencing and ends up with a confusing amount of data. With CATCH, he suggests one can take advantage of CRISPR to isolate just the target DNA one is looking for. As our audience will know, most of the methods we use today, say in cancer diagnostics, are looking “under the lamppost,” using templates of known mutations rather than being able to discover what’s actually there.

“You could PCR out large pieces of the genome, but it’s hard and tedious, because you need a lot of primer sets. If it’s a very variable region like BRCA, you may have problems with your primer design, which won’t fit. This is another, hopefully more elegant way of taking out the intact region of interest of the genome and analyzing it very deeply,” he says.

Yuval’s lab is one to keep on our radar.



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